Skip to content

Short Moments From A Long Time Ago

Do you have short memories from a long time ago?

allenrizzi

We all have those short moments tucked away in the dusty little corners of our minds. They are times from the past, often encapsulated and accessible only along with other small bits from decades ago. The human mind is a wonderful thing, rich in its ability to recall minute details from a long time ago. Nature’s hard disc is in many ways superior to the device on which this is being stored.

For me, many of those short little moments are gathered from my time surfing in Southern California during the 1960s. They are loosely stitched together in my brain as sort of a patchwork quilt; warm to the re-cognitive touch and comprised of thousands of little scenes. Like many my age I enjoy visiting my quilted past regularly, perhaps in fear that someday soon I will lose the ability to recall these wonderful moments. The Rising Sons Surf Club…

View original post 1,004 more words

Lunedi Senza Parole #21

Indovina dove! Guess where!
Foto © Allen E. Rizzi

Please follow this blog by clicking  follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

Armistice Day

Well, we are here again folks. I’ll let this 1918 postcard of my grandfather’s do the talking. The whole story is in my book, The Horse Whisperers from Anaconda.

Please follow this blog by clicking  follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

My Fishing Days Are Closing Fast

“There is a time and season for all things under heaven.” I am starting to be a believer. I have been a fly fisherman since the age of four. That is some 67 years in total. I have fished all over the world and in every part of the Western United States. I have always enthusiastically enjoyed wading into any stream to ply my craft as a fly fisherman. It is what I have done weekly for seven decades. This year, however, I noticed a change.

As last fall’s trout season heated up in Western North Carolina, I found myself preoccupied with the ambient temperature. If it was down in the thirties or below, I seemed to have found an excuse to stay home by the fire. Christ, I remember a mere 30 years ago when I thought nothing of heading out for Steelhead when the temperature in Oregon was 15 degrees. No biggie! I just had to de-ice by guides before each cast. I am now writing this with the hiss of my gas fireplace before me as a whispering, whimpering witness.

I remember with great fondness my father and his fishing persistence. This was a man who in any temperature could eagerly put his whole line into the air on Oregon’s Rogue River well into his eighties. It wasn’t until one gray day on the Lower Rogue that I noticed he was out of breath. He had his aortic valve changed for one of a pig and was back on various rivers in no time. Yes, he slowed down a bit but only a bit. He could still cast circles around most other fishermen in his late eighties, including me.

This last year, I wasn’t in the water as much as usual. I coughed-up excuses like, “Well, maybe later when the weather warms up.” The weather did eventually warm-up but I was not on the stream as much in any case. Oh yes, there was the back that ached, the knee that just wasn’t any good, recent surgeries, and a plethora of super lame excuses. The truth was that I was just getting older and was turning into a bit of a “gentlemen fisherman.” Yuk!

I am looking at another season ahead and remember those bright days of my youth on Northern California’s Owens River. I am confident that I will once again conquer time and be on the stream bright and early… Well, maybe by noon. In the end, I suppose that I must accept that my fishing days are closing fast.

For a much longer treatment of this subject and how we often trade places with our parents, please purchase my book: https://www.amazon.com/Blackest-Canyons-Allen-Rizzi-ebook/dp/B00BCQNE6I/

Note: The photo of me and a nice steelhead was taken on Oregon’s Smith River in 1996. It was only 32 degrees on the water that day! 🙄 Photo by Jerry Edin.

Please follow this blog by clicking  follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

Sweet Betsy From Pike

I was thinking about mom tonight and thought this was worth reblogging. Enjoy!

allenrizzi

Sweet Betsy From Pike is an American ballad about the trials of a pioneer named Betsy and her lover Ike who migrate from Pike County, Missouri to California. This Gold Rush-era song, with lyrics written by John A. Stone before 1858, was collected and published in Carl Sandburg’s 1927 American Songbag. It has been recorded by Burl Ives, Johnny Cash and many others. The melody is of English extraction and is also that of the ballad “Villikins and his Dinah”.

I have always liked this song as my mother’s family was from Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri. It was the departure point for many people who went west during the Gold Rush, including many from my mother’s family. I used the opening lines from this song for the opening lines in my book, The Horse Whisperers from Anaconda. Here are the complete lyrics:

Sweet Betsy From Pike

Did you ever…

View original post 565 more words

Lunedi Senza Parole #20

Indovina dove! Guess where!
Foto © Allen E. Rizzi

Please follow this blog by clicking  follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

Mr. Bojangles

Okay, first of all I’m not talking chicken here so relax and put down that beer!

Mr. Bojangles is a terrifically popular song written by Jerry Jeff Walker. The authorship may surprise a few of you outside the songwriting industry as it was the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band that first made the song popular followed by Sammy Davis Jr. Let’s take a look.

American country music artist Jerry Jeff Walker wrote this song for his 1968 album of the same title. Since then, it has been recorded by many other artists, including US country music band the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, whose 1970 version was issued as a single and rose to #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1971. Live versions of the song appeared on Walker’s 1977 album, A Man Must Carry On, and his 1980 album The Best of Jerry Jeff Walker and he sang it with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band on their 2015 concert album entitled “Circlin’ Back”. The song, however, is most widely associated with Sammy Davis Jr., who made the song part of his stage shows and live television performances for nearly two decades.

Many recording artists have covered this song. They include: Kristofer Åström, Chet Atkins, Hugues Aufray (French version, 1984), Harry Belafonte, Bermuda Triangle Band, David Bromberg, Garth Brooks, Dennis Brown, George Burns, David Campbell, Bobby Cole, Edwyn Collins, Jim Croce, Jamie Cullum, King Curtis, Sammy Davis Jr., John Denver, Neil Diamond, Cornell Dupree, Bob Dylan, Bobbie Gentry, Arlo Guthrie, Tom T. Hall, John Holt, Whitney Houston, Queen Ifrica, Billy Joel, Dave Jarvis, Elton John, Frankie Laine, Lulu, Rod McKuen, Don McLean, MC Neat, Bebe Neuwirth, Harry Nilsson, Dolly Parton, Johnny Paycheck, Esther Phillips, Ray Quinn, Mike Schank, Helge Schneider, Nina Simone, Corben Simpson, Todd Snider, Cat Stevens, Jim Stafford, Jud Strunk, Radka Toneff, Bradley Walsh, Robbie Williams, Paul Winter and yours truly.

Here are the sympathetic lyrics in their entirety:

I knew a man, Bojangles and he danced for you
In worn out shoes
Silver hair, a ragged shirt and baggy pants
The old soft shoe
He jumped so high
He jumped so high
Then he’d lightly touch down
I met him in a cell in New Orleans, I was
Down and out
He looked to me to be the eyes of age
As he spoke right out
He talked of life
He talked of life
He laughed, clicked his heels and stepped
He said his name, Bojangles and he danced a lick
Across the cell
He grabbed his pants, a better stance
Oh, he jumped so high
Then he clicked his heels
He let go a laugh
He let go a laugh
Pushed back his clothes all around
Mr. Bojangles
Mr. Bojangles
Mr. Bojangles
Dance
He danced for those in minstrel shows and county fairs
Throughout the south
He spoke with tears of fifteen years how his dog and him
Traveled about
The dog up and died
He up and died
After twenty years he still grieves
He said I dance now at every chance in honky tonks
For drinks and tips
But most the time I spend behind these county bars
He said I drinks a bit
He shook his head
And as he shook his head
I heard someone ask him please
Please
Mr. Bojangles
Mr. Bojangles
Mr. Bojangles
Dance

I have to insert a short note here. When I played professionally during the 1970’s, this song was often requested so I played it quite often. At home my little boy, who I raised by myself, used to always ask tearfully, “Why did the dog have to die?” Life’s lessons come early.

Jerry Jeff Walker is credited with saying he was inspired to write the song after an encounter with a street performer in a New Orleans jail. While in jail for public intoxication in 1965, Walker met a homeless black man who called himself “Mr. Bojangles” to conceal his true identity from the police. He had been arrested as part of a police sweep of indigent people that was carried out following a high-profile murder. The two men and others in the cell chatted about many things, but when Mr. Bojangles told a story about his dog, the mood in the room turned heavy. Someone else in the cell asked for something to lighten the mood, so Mr. Bojangles obliged with a short tap dance.

Here is the most popular version of the song by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band:

Here’s my favorite rendition, that of Sammy Davis Jr.

Which do you like best? Let’s hear from some of you followers out there!

Please follow this blog by clicking follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

Lago di Garda – Lake Of Lakes

Talking with friends from Italy today and they reminded me to re-post this. Enjoy!

allenrizzi

Lago di Garda is Italy’s largest but perhaps not best known lake. It sits just north of Verona and extends northward toward the Italian Alps with a total length of almost 52 kilometers. When one thinks of lakes in Italy, Lake Garda’s neighbors Como and Maggiore often come to mind. These are located further west, but like Garda are fed from waters flowing south out of the mountains.

Lago di Garda was formed in the last ice age when huge glaciers pushed southward toward what is now the Po Plain. At one time, the lake was actually a fjord of the distant Adriatic Sea. Today it is one of the grandest jewels in all of Italy and a frequent tourist destination for Europeans. But what about Americans? Although a few Americans do find their way to its shores, Lago di Garda is often overlooked as Americans often travel between Milan…

View original post 692 more words

Lunedi Senza Parole #19

Indovina dove! Guess where!
Foto © Allen E. Rizzi

Please follow this blog by clicking  follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

Wo Ist Es Gegangen?

Sonntag Gedanken…

allenrizzi

Schöne Dinge nicht dauern. In der Nähe unseres Hauses, hat ein Holzschnitzer viele schöne Arbeiten an der Hauptstraße gemacht. Jedoch ist ein Paar von ihnen wurden von Dieben weggenommen. Warum?

Vor Jahren gab es eine wundervolle Schnitzerei eines Kaninchens. Jetzt ist es nur ein Stumpf. Die Fahrt nach Meran ist nicht so schön, wie es einmal war.

Ein schön geschnitzt hölzernes Kaninchen an der GampenpassStraße. Jetzt kann man nur fragen “Wo ist es gegangen?”

Foto von Allen Rizzi (Tret, Nonstal)

Please follow this blog by clicking follow below. Your comments are always welcome.

Read author Allen E. Rizzi’s latest books available at Amazon.com

Read author Allen E Rizzi 3

View original post