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‘At’s ‘he ‘hing, Inin It?

February 27, 2021

Blimey!

allenrizzi

America seems to have a love affair with Brits and Aussies. We demand that our commercials and newscasts are delivered by people who can not speak American English. We seem to think the archaic language of our distant cousins in the British Isles and their former penal colony is somehow cool.

Turn on your television (Telly) and you will hear our beautiful language butchered in every conceivable way in order to sell something. But, of course selling is the name of the game. ‘At’s ‘he ‘hing, inin It? There’s a bloke from down under pandering cleaning products with his Crocodile Dundee-like toothy grin. Lord, it really seems like there should be a billy bong in there somewhere from which springs a giant croc to swallow this bloke up. I mean this dude is really annoying!

But wait there’s more. Virtually every major news channel in the United States has their…

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5 Comments
  1. A certain form of snobbery, is it? I normally speak more british English, And if I’m with Brits, “worse”. But when I’m with Americans I tend to adjust my accent unconsciously.
    Cheers Mate.
    (Or the Alabamer version: Ye be good naw ye hear?)
    😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • I too speak both versions. This is just a tongue in cheek piece with no snobbery intended. Unfortunately, I have to switch my accent very consciously (grinding gears).😎

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      • I know, the snobbery is about the producers… In a certain sense. Or maybe it’s just that a Brit or Ozzie accent has turned exotic. Actually, I’ve been watching old classics, Jimmy Stewart et al. Up till the late fifties Americans would say “How d’you do” when meeting someone. Fashions.
        Grinding gears? I can relate. Not on accents, on spelling. I tend to “harbour” no grudge about O in lieu of O, but I tend to write OUR. My grinding gears fail me on double consonnants. A mix-up of languages. Spanish has no double consonnants, French and English do. Generally at odds. “Littéraire”, “literary”, so, sometimes, writing English, I find myself wondering… Buona notte. Er. Bupn giorno, I guess, you’re still in the US, right. Take care.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Still in the U.S. but should be heading back to Italy within the next two months. Fortunately, I still use my Italian, German, Spanish, French, Portuguese and a couple of others on a daily basis. Gotta keep this old brain from rusting-out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Two months now? Best of luck. We rescheduled our last year tickets to Paris for this July. We’ll see how it goes.
        Daily basis? Compliments. I generally use three: Spanish, English and French. Grandson is in the French kindergarten, so I speak to him in “Frog” all the time. Buona Sera.

        Liked by 1 person

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